Friday, 8 July 2011

Almonte Celtfest returns this weekend, Promoting Celtic culture in the Valley

EMC Events - Celtfest is coming up this weekend (July 8-10), and offers more fun and excitement for its 15th year.

"This year's event literally is bigger and better," says Jim Mountain, Almonte Celtfest Organizing Committee. "It is a tribute to all the performers, volunteers and supporters who have made Celtfest possible over the past 15 years."

Beginning Friday night and running through Sunday, Almonte's annual celebration features three jam-packed days of Celtic art, music and song, language and culture. The event takes place in "one of the best natural amphitheatres in Canada - Gemmill Park," as well as Almonte's Old Town Hall.

"Come and celebrate with us the great traditional and contemporary music, song and dance of the Ottawa Valley region," says Mountain. "Discover your inner Celt!"

He notes nearly 200 performers will entertain residents and visitors during the festival.

With Celtfest's growing popularity, musicians and bands desire to make the festival's playbill, and apply for the opportunity to travel and perform here.

Although Celtfest runs rain or shine, Mountain hopes Mother Nature cooperates.

"If the weather is perfect, we can expect more than 5,000 visitors," he says.

The Almonte Celtfest Organizing Committee sees the occasion as a regional destination event, which is "fully" backed by the Town of Mississippi Mills and the Building Communities Through Arts and Heritage Program (Department of Canadian Heritage). In addition, more than 60 local businesses lend support.

Once again, this year's Masters of Ceremony are Reg Gamble and Terry-Lynn Mahusky.

Pub night

Almonte Celtfest Pub Night is back Friday, July 8, and from 8 p.m. until close, area pubs and restaurants will feature live entertainment.

In Almonte, Corkery Road, - a four-piece Celtic band that specializes in high-energy, infectious and traditional music - performs at the Barley Mow, and Les mots dits Anglais is at the Naismith Sports Pub. Beginning at 7 p.m., Irish harpist Clare Dwyer entertains at the Heirloom Café.

Carleton Place's Ballygiblins and St. James Gate (Cratur) will also keep patrons thoroughly amused.

Catch Montreal-based group Salty Dog, playing Celtic folk music with a distinctively 'Maritime' flavour, at JR's Downstairs Pub Saturday night (July 9).

Gemmill Park

At the Almonte Old Town Hall Saturday, July 9, Celtfest (partnered with the Ottawa Valley School of Traditional Music and Mississippi Mills Musicworks) offers a number of workshops - Irish fiddle (Matt Pepin), Cape Breton fiddle (Don Fletcher), piano accompaniment (Jim Hunter), bodhran drum (Alistair Dennett), tin whistle and Irish flute (Chuck Quick) and Irish harp (Clare Dwyer).

Each workshop, running from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., costs $20.

Early in the day, visitors to the Almonte Farmers' Market can catch the sounds of The Barley Shakers.

There is no admission charge for Celtfest's main stage performances at Gemmill Park, however, donations will be accepted. Organizers ask that no pets be brought to the event.

Commencing at 2:00 pm and ending at dusk, Saturday's lineup is as follows: The Cape Breton Fiddlers (2:15 p.m.), The Boxty Band (3:15 p.m.), The Barley Shakers (4:10 p.m.), Julie Fitzgerald & Friends (5:05 p.m.), Brandy N Port (6 p.m.), Wade Foster and doubleback (6:55 p.m.), Salty Dog (7:50 p.m.) and The Rogues (8:45 p.m.) who in 2010 won a "battle of the Celtic bands" event over 64 other bands in the USA.

According to Mountain, Celtfest also features outstanding food and refreshments, and excellent artisans.

"There's also a Celts children's area with face painting and games," he adds.

Day three

On Sunday, July 10, Celfest commences with the Fiddle Mass at Holy Name of Mary Catholic Church, beginning at 10:30 a.m.

From noon until 6 p.m., the action starts back up in Gemmill Park. Main Stage entertainment is as follows: Monday Night Fiddlers (12 p.m.), Les mots dits Anglais (12:40 p.m.), Valley Heritage Radio's Dai Bassett (1:15 p.m.), Triple Trouble (1:45 p.m.), Corkery Road (2:25 p.m.), Heather Dale Band (3:20 p.m.), the Celtfest Friends tribute to the 15th Anniversary (4:25 p.m.) and at 5 p.m. The Rogues.

The O'Connell Acoustic Session Tent is a huge draw, says Mountain.

"It's a huge jam session," he adds. "People just come for it. It's like a community coming together, and is a true reflection of this area."

Award

Danny O'Connell Memorial Award, established in 2004, is owned and administered by the Community Foundation of Ottawa, which provides a cash award annual to a traditional fiddler under the age of 25.

"The award will be given out on stage Sunday," says Mountain.

Mississippi Mills Mayor John Levi will be speaking during the festival's opening ceremonies.

"The town is a huge support," says Mountain. "In addition, they helped us secure a Trillium grant."

For more information, please visit www.almonteceltfest.com

"Celtfest takes thousands of volunteer hours and a year to do it," says Mountain.

Almonte Celtfest returns this weekend, Promoting Celtic culture in the Valley - Events - By Tara Gesner Almonte/Carleton Place Local Community News

Thursday, 7 July 2011

Saline Celtic Festival Offers Great Music Line-Up

Cathie RyanCover of Cathie Ryan
“You can’t swing a cat without hitting a fiddler,” is a fact at the July 9 Saline Celtic Festival, according to entertainment chair Sheila Graziano.

Two high school fiddle groups – Fiddlers ReStrung from Saline, and The Tecumseh Fiddlers – will launch the day on the Red Dragon Stage.

The Tecumseh Fiddlers are directed by Saline High School grad Amy Feldcamp Marr. One of the original members of the Saline Fiddlers Philharmonic, she played with that group at the first Saline Celtic Festival.

“Amy has established, from scratch, the entire orchestra program in the Tecumseh Schools, and started this fiddle group four years ago to give to the Tecumseh community some of the riches she gleaned from her own experiences in Saline,” Graziano says.

The high school fiddlers will be followed by Blue Fiddle, featuring Tom Ware on fiddle; and a performance by the current (and youngest ever) U.S. Open Scottish Fiddle Champion, Maura Shawn Scanlin. Fiddler Matt Mancuso, a former lead fiddler for Lord of the Dance, plays with The Cathie Ryan Band; Cape Breton fiddler Dan MacDonald is part of North Atlantic Drift; and fiddlers Devin Shepherd and Rose Duffy are one-third of the band Chicago Reel. Local fiddler Brad Battey will play for the CommonWealth Dance Collective.

“Now that’s a lot of fiddles,” Graziano says.

The festival’s headliners are The Cathie Ryan Band, Chicago Reel, North Atlantic Drift, and Blue Fiddle.

Blue Fiddle’s sound draws from Irish, bluegrass, folk, roots, jazz, and polka. Formed in 2004, the Arkansas-based acoustic trio comprises multi-instrumentalists and award-winning songwriters Joe Hamilton, Tom Ware and John Lindquist.

Beth Patterson, who will host the Mr. Pretty Legs In Kilt contest Friday evening before entertaining the pub crowd, will host the Red Dragon Stage on Saturday, and perform throughout the afternoon and evening. The multi-instrumentalist is primarily a player of the eight and ten stringed Irish bouzoukis.

Irish American Cathie Ryan had a seven-year tenure as lead singer of Cherish the Ladies. The Detroit native has released four critically acclaimed CDs on Shanachie Records and is featured on more than 40 compilations of Celtic music.

Chicago Reel performs traditional Irish music, with two fiddles, banjo, button box, piano and vocals and songs rooted in the Sean Nos (old style) tradition.

Dan MacDonald, Ross Griffiths and Brian Taheny from North Atlantic Drift play Cape Breton fiddle, Sligo fiddle, banjo, guitar, mandolin, Uilleann pipes, Highland pipes, whistles and bodhran. The three will also teach workshops on the Friday evening.

Bryan Kelso Crow, host of the Brecon Stage and well known as the host and producer of NPR’s Celtic Connections radio show, will perform with Mike Shanahan as The Celtic Connections Band.

“We’re very excited to have Road Kilt, our ‘house’ Celtic rock band return for Friday’s Pub night,” Graziano says. “Based in Washtenaw County, the group includes two alumni of Saline High School: fiddler Jessie Nieves, and my son Ezra. It’s an all new show with original material – these folks have been busy this past year.”

Other local acts include Blackthorn, Ealain Ceime Irish Dance School, and Ann Arbor Morris.

“Once again, I’m overwhelmed at the quality and variety of performers who will be gracing our stages,” Graziano says. “Our musicians are from around North America as well as from across the pond, representing music from Ireland, Scotland, Cape Breton and the United States. Always eager to involve the public, there are plenty of hands-on – and feet-on – activities both Friday evening and Saturday. It’s part of my mission to offer opportunities for people to get involved and inspired. For those who prefer to simply listen and watch, there will be 12 solid hours of stage activity to enjoy!

“My heartbeat hastens every time I think about how cool this fest is going to be. I have ‘audience envy’ – I wish I could sit and listen and watch all day rather than running around like a crazy person making sure everything is OK.”

The July 9 festival, running from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m., also will feature jousting knights, clan encampments, living history reenactments, pipe bands, weaving demonstrations, sheepdogs, rugby games, an Irish Song and Dance competition, food and drink, Celtic merchandise, Highland athletics, and Millie the Mill Pond Monster. Festivalgoers can take part in a “Celtic Survivor” contest, or the Haggis Hurl, Celtic Clobber or Golf Chip.

Tickets for the July 8 Pub Night at Mill Pond Park are $5 at the gate. Tickets at the gate on July 9 are $5 for ages 13 to 17; $15 for adults; $10 for seniors and veterans. Active military, and children 12 and under are free. After 8 p.m., the cost is $5. Adult tickets are $10 when purchased online.

Tickets may also be purchased in advance at various locations in Saline; at the City Hall office counter; and at the Celtic Festival Office in City Hall.

For more information visit www.salineceltic.org.

Saline Celtic Festival Offers Great Music Line-Up - Saline-Milan, MI Patch

Saline Celtic Festival Offers Great Music Line-Up

“You can’t swing a cat without hitting a fiddler,” is a fact at the July 9 Saline Celtic Festival, according to entertainment chair Sheila Graziano.

Two high school fiddle groups – Fiddlers ReStrung from Saline, and The Tecumseh Fiddlers – will launch the day on the Red Dragon Stage.

The Tecumseh Fiddlers are directed by Saline High School grad Amy Feldcamp Marr. One of the original members of the Saline Fiddlers Philharmonic, she played with that group at the first Saline Celtic Festival.

“Amy has established, from scratch, the entire orchestra program in the Tecumseh Schools, and started this fiddle group four years ago to give to the Tecumseh community some of the riches she gleaned from her own experiences in Saline,” Graziano says.

The high school fiddlers will be followed by Blue Fiddle, featuring Tom Ware on fiddle; and a performance by the current (and youngest ever) U.S. Open Scottish Fiddle Champion, Maura Shawn Scanlin. Fiddler Matt Mancuso, a former lead fiddler for Lord of the Dance, plays with The Cathie Ryan Band; Cape Breton fiddler Dan MacDonald is part of North Atlantic Drift; and fiddlers Devin Shepherd and Rose Duffy are one-third of the band Chicago Reel. Local fiddler Brad Battey will play for the CommonWealth Dance Collective.

“Now that’s a lot of fiddles,” Graziano says.

The festival’s headliners are The Cathie Ryan Band, Chicago Reel, North Atlantic Drift, and Blue Fiddle.

Blue Fiddle’s sound draws from Irish, bluegrass, folk, roots, jazz, and polka. Formed in 2004, the Arkansas-based acoustic trio comprises multi-instrumentalists and award-winning songwriters Joe Hamilton, Tom Ware and John Lindquist.

Beth Patterson, who will host the Mr. Pretty Legs In Kilt contest Friday evening before entertaining the pub crowd, will host the Red Dragon Stage on Saturday, and perform throughout the afternoon and evening. The multi-instrumentalist is primarily a player of the eight and ten stringed Irish bouzoukis.

Irish American Cathie Ryan had a seven-year tenure as lead singer of Cherish the Ladies. The Detroit native has released four critically acclaimed CDs on Shanachie Records and is featured on more than 40 compilations of Celtic music.

Chicago Reel performs traditional Irish music, with two fiddles, banjo, button box, piano and vocals and songs rooted in the Sean Nos (old style) tradition.

Dan MacDonald, Ross Griffiths and Brian Taheny from North Atlantic Drift play Cape Breton fiddle, Sligo fiddle, banjo, guitar, mandolin, Uilleann pipes, Highland pipes, whistles and bodhran. The three will also teach workshops on the Friday evening.

Bryan Kelso Crow, host of the Brecon Stage and well known as the host and producer of NPR’s Celtic Connections radio show, will perform with Mike Shanahan as The Celtic Connections Band.

“We’re very excited to have Road Kilt, our ‘house’ Celtic rock band return for Friday’s Pub night,” Graziano says. “Based in Washtenaw County, the group includes two alumni of Saline High School: fiddler Jessie Nieves, and my son Ezra. It’s an all new show with original material – these folks have been busy this past year.”

Other local acts include Blackthorn, Ealain Ceime Irish Dance School, and Ann Arbor Morris.

“Once again, I’m overwhelmed at the quality and variety of performers who will be gracing our stages,” Graziano says. “Our musicians are from around North America as well as from across the pond, representing music from Ireland, Scotland, Cape Breton and the United States. Always eager to involve the public, there are plenty of hands-on – and feet-on – activities both Friday evening and Saturday. It’s part of my mission to offer opportunities for people to get involved and inspired. For those who prefer to simply listen and watch, there will be 12 solid hours of stage activity to enjoy!

“My heartbeat hastens every time I think about how cool this fest is going to be. I have ‘audience envy’ – I wish I could sit and listen and watch all day rather than running around like a crazy person making sure everything is OK.”

The July 9 festival, running from 10 a.m. to 11 p.m., also will feature jousting knights, clan encampments, living history reenactments, pipe bands, weaving demonstrations, sheepdogs, rugby games, an Irish Song and Dance competition, food and drink, Celtic merchandise, Highland athletics, and Millie the Mill Pond Monster. Festivalgoers can take part in a “Celtic Survivor” contest, or the Haggis Hurl, Celtic Clobber or Golf Chip.

Tickets for the July 8 Pub Night at Mill Pond Park are $5 at the gate. Tickets at the gate on July 9 are $5 for ages 13 to 17; $15 for adults; $10 for seniors and veterans. Active military, and children 12 and under are free. After 8 p.m., the cost is $5. Adult tickets are $10 when purchased online.

Tickets may also be purchased in advance at various locations in Saline; at the City Hall office counter; and at the Celtic Festival Office in City Hall.

For more information visit www.salineceltic.org.

Saline Celtic Festival Offers Great Music Line-Up - Saline-Milan, MI Patch

Wednesday, 6 July 2011

Paul Keating | Catskills Irish Arts Week | The Green Hills of the Catskills | Cultural Conversation by Earle Hitchner - WSJ.com

When Paul Keating became artistic director of the Catskills Irish Arts Week in November 2003, he knew its coming 10th anniversary as a weeklong summer school for Irish traditional music and dance represented a rare opportunity. "It was a chance to further establish the school and enhance its programming," he recently recalled over the phone from his home in Hillsdale, N.J. "So I increased the instructional classes and expanded the rental of classrooms in a nearby elementary school that doubled the space for teaching." Mr. Keating also found additional funding sources, hired a lawyer to handle visa applications for overseas artists, refined the live sessions of Irish music so that they'd be more comfortable for performers and listeners alike, and scheduled music lectures for each weekday and more CD launches throughout the week. "I wanted it to be as good as it could be," he said.

The 17th annual Catskills Irish Arts Week will be held from July 10 to 16 in East Durham, N.Y., and the artists Mr. Keating has hired to teach and perform there attest to how successfully he's accomplished his goal during the past eight years of his tenure. "It certainly is one of the biggies of Irish music summer schools each year and is part of the working musician's calendar of choice," noted John Carty, a renowned fiddler and banjoist living in Boyle, Ireland, who will be teaching at CIAW for the second time. "You hear people talking about Willie Week, the Catskills and Drumshanbo in the same breath," Mr. Carty added, referring to Ireland's Willie Clancy Summer School in Miltown Malbay and Joe Mooney Summer School for Irish Music in Drumshanbo.

To Myron Bretholz, a gifted player and teacher of the bodhran (a hand-held Irish frame drum) who lives in Baltimore and was CIAW artistic director in 2001, prestige alone doesn't explain its full appeal. "For many folks, CIAW provides them with more Irish traditional music, dance, songs and crafts in one concentrated week than they're likely to hear and see during the other 51 weeks of the year," he said.

Paul Keating | Catskills Irish Arts Week | The Green Hills of the Catskills | Cultural Conversation by Earle Hitchner - WSJ.com:

Tuesday, 5 July 2011

Catskills set for Irish Arts Week

The Catskills Mountains will come alive from July 10-16 for the 17th annual Catskills Irish Arts Week (CIAW), in East Durham, New York. One of the most popular weeks in the Catskills Irish calendar, this internationally-renowned summer school - the largest in North America devoted to traditional Irish music and dance - is operated by the Michael J. Quill Irish Cultural and Sports Centre, under the artistic direction of Paul Keating.

In all, some 120 classes in all types of traditional Irish musical instruments are on offer across varying levels, as well as set dancing classes, contemporary and Sean Nos step dancing instruction, and Celtic crafts workshops in painting, quilting, metal, jewelry and more. There is also a children’s Irish culture program which runs from Monday to Friday for those aged 5-12.

Daily topical lectures and video screenings will include The Yellow Bittern and Beautiful People, as well as a special talk from Len Graham on Joe Holmes, based around his biography of Holmes, Here I Am Among You. As evenings fall the CIAW faculty will perform open air concerts on the Quill Festival Grounds from 7:30-9:30pm, followed by Ceili dances from 9pm to midnight. The week culminates with the Andy McGann Traditional Music and Dance Festival on Saturday, July 16, from 12 noon to 7pm.

One highlight of this year’s festival will be a special Ceili on Wednesday, July 13 from 6-10pm at the Lincoln Center’s Damrosch Park, as part of the “Midsummer Night Swing” dance series. Charlie Harris, Maeve Donnelly, Eamonn and Geraldine Cotter, Caitlin nic Gabhann and John Carty will provide the Irish dance and music for this one-off treat, sponsored by Culture Ireland and its Imagine Ireland 2011 program [visit lincolncenter.org for more]. For everything you need to know about the Catskills Irish Arts Week, contact the MJ Quill Irish Center at 518-634-2286, or see catskillsirishartsweek.org.

The Irish Emigrant - Catskills set for Irish Arts Week

Oh, for the love of Ireland, August festival to share rich culture

A group of Irish natives and lovers of the Emerald Isle’s cultural traditions have launched a new nonprofit organization known as Culture Ireland Tennessee.

The group is already planning a traditional Irish festival Aug. 5-7 on the grounds of O’More College of Design and around downtown Franklin.

One of the goals of the Authentic Ireland Festival is to celebrate Irish roots in music, song, dance, film and literature with an interesting review on how they have influenced the country and bluegrass musical traditions in Middle Tennessee.

The weekend’s events will kick off at 6 p.m. Aug. 5 evening with A Taste of Ireland at The Factory at Franklin. There will be dancing and informal presentations about growing up in Ireland and the country’s history. The event will be geared toward children.

On Aug. 6, several workshops on O’More’s campus will focus on musical instruments such as the button accordion, fiddle, uilleann pipes and flute, along with performances and sean nós singing and dancing.

All bluegrass musicians and country musicians are encouraged to visit the Culture of Ireland Tennessee Web page through www.omorecollege.edu for details on how to participate in the sessions.

Documentary will be shown

The festival will also play host to the premiere of Good Piping, a documentary film about Ireland’s uilleann pipers. The film will be shown 6 p.m. Aug. 6 and 4 p.m. Aug. 7 on O’More’s campus.

The documentary is the creation of filmmaker Davis Watson, who in 2008 sold his belongings and set off around Ireland to document the uilleann piping tradition. Shot over two years, Good Piping is a mix of music and song, story and place, individuality and shared tradition — a film that moves in and out of the lives of a handful of Ireland’s finest uilleann pipers, such as Seán McKiernan, Néillidh Mulligan, Kevin Rowsome, Jimmy O’Brien-Moran and many others.

There also will be various daily lectures and group discussions to cover all things Irish — from art and history to music and dancing — and on Aug. 6, after the film premiere, an open concert will feature the Irish musicians who traveled to Franklin for the festival.

Sister cities of Franklin and Williamson County’s Passport to the World Lecture Series will continue on campus at 2 p.m. Aug. 7 with the artists in from Ireland, including Éilís Crean, Johnny Óg Connolly, Máirín Ui Céide, Meaití Jó Shéamuis Ó Fátharta and Máire Áine Ní Iarnáin, discussing their native influences and experiences.

For more information on Culture Ireland Tennessee, visit www.omorecollege.edu, “like” the CIT Facebook page at www.facebook.com/CultureIrelandTennessee, or email Éilís Crean at eiliscrean@gmail.com.

Oh, for the love of Ireland, August festival to share rich culture | The Tennessean | tennessean.com

Girsa shows they’re growing up

Six years ago in the midst of the frenzied Catskills Irish Arts Week in East Durham at a special afternoon reception on the Quill Festival Grounds, some young students were asked to perform sampling how the CIAW was influencing the generational passage for traditional Irish music.

Among those displaying their talents that day were some very young teenage women who made a deep impression for their vocal and tune-playing skill and poise on stage and behind a microphone.

Coming from the Pearl River cauldron of music education and promotion, they hit their stride at the upstate summer school as they were exposed to more master teachers who encouraged them along with their parents.

It was the nascent days of Girsa, the all-female ensemble who were developing an approach to Irish music and performance that belied their age but not their background and training.

Following on an impressive debut two years ago of their first self-titled CD, they have just released their second CD A Sweeter Place, and not surprisingly it is once again sure to please the listener and show pride for a younger generation that gets the music and grows along with it.

To outside observers the intervening two years between the CD will probably seem like one of those “growth spurts” that we associate with child-rearing, but we might underestimate the ensemble collectively known as Girsa (or young girls as Bearla). Sure, the first CD sent signals worldwide that the music scene in Pearl River, where seven of the eight members hail from, was developing talent at an extraordinary clip, and that these young women were in the vanguard as some of the earliest and most successful student crop.

After all, now college women, last summer they headed off to three of the largest Irish festivals in the country in Dublin, Ohio, Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Kansas City, Missouri where they learned about performing for larger audiences and the wider world of entertainment and how to position themselves for more work for the musical passion they possess.

From that day in the Catskills, it was clear that the Girsa girls took their music seriously and listened attentively not only to their teachers but other musical influences in their daily lives and sought to make their own way individually and also in a group format introduced to them through the ceili band format.

Like Cherish the Ladies and Liadan, and many years before either of them Macalla, there was a performance path beyond the Fleadh Cheoil for discerning women in the music. If Cherish the Ladies was spurred on by the daddies, it was the mammies who helped mold the Girsa package. With a lot of seasoning under their belts, the Girsa girls have come of age now.

There are 16 tracks on the new recording which primarily shows off the four vocalists in the group, and to their credit they have differentiated themselves on this CD.

There is a well-founded confidence in the singing of Deirdre Brennan, Margaret Dudasik, Pamela Geraghty and Emily McShane displayed not only in the song selections but in their individual delivery as well. They can harmonize and complement each other, but they are all blessed with beautiful voices and are finding out more and more how to tailor them to their own strengths and feelings.

With two songs each they have ample opportunity to stretch and differentiate and interpret songwriters like Dougie McLean (Emily McShane), John Spillane (Emily McShane), Van Morrison (Deirdre Brennan) and even the Dillards (Margaret Dudasik) while giving the tradition its due through a wonderful rendition of “Ar Eireann Ni Neosfainn Ce Hi,” a/k/a “For Ireland I’ll not Tell Her Name by Pamela Geraghty.”

After a log-cabin liaison in the Catskills last year, Galway singer Don Stiffe joined the girls in the recording studio and laid down a duet with Pamela on the Mountains of Pomeroy. Also guesting on the CD are Joanie Madden, Anna Colliton, Jason Sypher and Gabriel Donahue who produced both CDs.

Girsa’s alter egos are also recognized as great musicians led by All-Ireland fiddler Maeve Flanagan, who did a lot of research and arrangements for the new CD ensuring that side of the CD wouldn’t come up short. Her own compositions feature as well and her whistle playing.

Blaithin Loughran’s accordion playing gets a well deserved solo nod, also and the deft keyboard work of both Emily McShane and Bernadette Flanagan (who does bodhran as well) stands out.

The blending of four voices in the group is also matched by four fine fiddlers in Maeve Flanagan, Brennan, Dudasik (who is from Nutley, New Jersey outside the pale of Pearl River where she studied under Rose Flanagan) and the eighth member Kristen McShane (Emily’s older sister).

You will find great variety on the CD and like so many great young artists in Irish music today, less of a pigeon-hold approach to what should be sung by Irish musicians.

You can purchase this CD and the earlier one at www.girsamusic.com. They will be performing at the Catskills Irish Arts Week on Monday, July 11 and also at the Andy McGann Festival on July 16 in East Durham where they will be at Gavin’s Resort on August 7.

Once again the Midwest Irish Festival beckons for them with appearances at the Cleveland Irish Festival July 22-24 and Kansas City over Labor Day.

Girsa shows they’re growing up | IrishCentral

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